Frank Sinatra Wiki
Ever Homeward
Composer
Jule Styne
Lyricist
Kazimierz Lubomirski (original Polish), Sammy Cahn (English)
Published
{{{published}}}
Album
Artist
Release
{{{orelease}}}
Recording
{{{orecording}}}
Release
Recording
December 8, 1947[1]
Royalties
{{{royalties}}}
Audio
{{{audio}}}
{{{Audio2title}}}
{{{audio2}}}
{{{Audio3title}}}
{{{audio3}}}

"Ever Homeward" is a song Frank Sinatra recorded under Columbia Records in 1947. Under contract to MGM, Sinatra was on loan to RKO to whom he still owed work from his prior contract with them. This resulted in 1948s The Miracle of the Bells, in which he played Fr. Paul, a priest in Coal Town, Pennsylvania where deceased actress (Alida Valli) has been returned by press agent (Fred Murray). Sinatra sings this, a cappella, in both English and Polish, showing MacMurray where Olga's parent's are buried. It is the only song in the film and is a soulful, dirge-like Slavic tune. The song is significant in that Sinatra reprised it 34 years later in a US Government Department of Information special television broadcast on 31 January 1982 to protest the December 1981 imposition of martial law in Poland, fearful of a Soviet invasion. This was the only song Sinatra ever sang in Polish. The music was adapted by June Styne from a mid-1800s Polish folk tune with original lyrics (in Polish, by Lubomirski) with new lyrics in English by Cahn. This rendition of the song was released as a B-side single for Sinatra. The A-side of this song was his rendition of "I've Got a Crush on You" which featured lush interlude and background by famous trumpet player Bobby Hackett.[2]

Lyrics[]

Ever homeward, ever homeward, yearns the weary rover,
Ever homeward, ever homeward, till the journey's over.
Warm embraces and friendly faces, saying welcome home,
Let me lie there 'neath the sky there, never more to roam.
Ever homeward, ever homeward, yearns the weary rover.
Ever homeward, over homeward, now the journey's over.
Ever homeward, ever homeward, yearns the weary rover.
Ever homeward, over homeward, now the journey's over.

References[]